On the 1st of December 2019 Home Secretary Priti Patel announced her plan to introduce a new Electronic Travel Authorisation system (ETA). EU and Commonwealth visitors will need to apply for new US-style visas to enter the UK after Brexit.

The aim is to make it easier for border officials to screen arrivals based on pre-arrival data provided; count visitors into and out of the UK and to block potential threats from entering the UK. The Home Office will know how many people are in the country and who is overstaying their visa.

Reported by Judit Adorjan

https://www.telegraph.co.uk/politics/2019/12/01/eu-commonwealth-visitors-have-apply-new-us-style-visas-enter/

EU citizens will no longer be permitted to use ID cards to enter the UK after a no deal Brexit, preventing criminals and illegal immigrants using fake documents. The EU ID cards, as travel documents, will be phased out by the end of 2020, requiring passports to be presented at UK borders. According to the EU border agency, Frontex, more than 7,000 people were detected trying to enter the bloc using fraudulent documents in 2016 – with most found trying to get into the UK.

https://www.telegraph.co.uk/politics/2019/09/06/eu-citizens-barred-entering-uk-cards-crackdown-criminals-using/

After 31 December 2020 EU citizens will be able to evidence their right to work (or rent) in the UK using their passport or their digital status granted under the EU Settlement Scheme or under the European Temporary Leave to Remain Scheme.

https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/no-deal-immigration-arrangements-for-eu-citizens-moving-to-the-uk-after-brexit/no-deal-immigration-arrangements-for-eu-citizens-arriving-after-brexit

In the light of the new proposals, EU citizens planning to travel to the UK who do not currently hold a passport are advised to apply for one as soon as possible.

Conservative Party plans include bringing in new powers to stop EU criminals at the border once the UK is no longer subject to freedom of movement rules. At present, under EU law, previous criminal convictions do not in themselves count as a reason to deny entry to or deport someone.

In regard to customs and border controls, future plans include risk-based, largely automated analysis of consignments entering the UK. There will be a mandatory collection of information on goods before they cross the border.